What is Cialis

Cialis is an oral drug used for treating impotence (inability to attain/maintain a penile erection) and relieving symptoms for benign prostatic hyperplasia. This drug belongs to a class of drugs known as phosphodiesterase-5 (PDE5) inhibitors that include vardenafil (Levitra) and sildenafil (Viagra). For an erection to take place, the blood should fill in the penis. This filling of blood causes the blood vessels that brings blood to the penis to enlarge. When these vessels are big in size, more blood enters the penis and at the same time, the blood vessels that empty's blood from the penis decreases in size and a little blood is removed from the penis.

Due to the erections caused by sexual stimulation, production and release of nitric oxide happen in the penis. This nitric oxide triggers the enzyme guanylate cyclase that then produces cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP). The cGMP is the one responsible for the decrease and increase of the blood vessels carrying blood in and out of the penis. It is cGMP that causes erection!

You should note that Cialis does not act as an HIV protection or any other sexually transmitted diseases (such as gonorrhea, hepatitis B, syphilis). Always practice “safe sex” that is by using latex condoms. You are free to consult your doctor or pharmacist for more information. This medication may be used for other purposes not listed in this guide. Do not use Cialis for a condition not listed here without consulting your healthcare provider first. There is also other Cialis brands used for treating high blood pressure in the lungs (pulmonary hypertension)

To stop the erection, an enzyme, phosphodiesterase-5 attacks cGMP, and the blood vessels go to their normal sizes and the blood leaves the penis. What happens is that Cialis prevents phosphodiesterase-5 from attacking cGMP so that cGMP stays around in the penis longer. The more cGMP stays in the penis, the more there is a prolonged engorgement of blood in the penis.

It is not yet certain how the mechanism of Cialis improves the BPH symptoms. The truth is, phosphodiesterase-5 is also present in the muscles of the prostate and bladder, and it has been found that the relaxation of these muscles results to difficulties in passing urine, for example, by pressure reduction in the muscle surrounding the urethra opening that controls the flow of urine from the bladder. It is vital to note that this drug does not protect you from sexually transmitted diseases.